The Technology

Subsea well intervention and control practices are hugely reliant on the use of fluid safety valves. Used in the complete lifecycle of the well, from exploration through to abandonment, the integrity, reliability and safety of these valves is crucial to the industry. Valves are not only used to provide high pressure, high temperature fluid containment but are also required to cut various well intervention media such as slickline, e-line, braided cable and coiled tubing.

Problem: Limitations of Ball Valves

revolution valve

1. Typical Ball and Seat

revolution valve

2. Cut Edge Deformation

revolution valve

3. Component Clash

revolution valve

4. Seal Face Damage

Traditionally the industry has relied on three main methods to ‘shear and seal’: the ball valve, the gate valve and where space permits, the shear ram. Valves cut with the same leading edge of the surface that is required to create a seal and this is vulnerable to damage so may not seal effectively. They are usually arranged in multiples or stacks for confidence. They often use large projecting external actuators which can add a large amount of space, weight and cost and rely on rubber / elastomer components.

Solution: The Revolution Principle

revolution valve

1. Shearing

revolution valve

2. Seat Clearance

revolution valve

3. Flapper Clearance

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4. Sealing

As the industry has looked for new ways to increase production, well bore sizes have become larger, but at the same time, imposed standards have become ever more stringent. The demands on these safety valves have increased exponentially, to a point where there has been uncertainty over future cost, reliability and compliance. It isn’t enough just to develop and build on existing technology as this would be cost prohibitive and technically limited, so a whole new approach is required that can address these challenges.